Top 10 International Albums of 2014

It’s that time of year, when I sell my soul, and conform to the expectation that all blogs, no matter how small and shitty (of which Soundly Sounds is both) needs to compile an end of year list, summarising all the great things that have been accomplished by the fair artists of the year. Now, if you’ve ever been on this blog, or heard words out of my mouth, it becomes apparent that I have a habit of hyperbole, and describing everything as “my favourite” or “the best thing ever”. Well, now it’s time to pay up, and show what I, King Deadshit, reckons is the best of the best this year.

With part one of the ‘Best of 2014’ thankfully out of the way (musings on the best music videos of 2014 this way), it’s time to turn our attention to the best international releases of 2014. As one ARIA red carpet attendee so accurately put it, Australian music sucks shit, and the only good music comes straight from our brothers n’ sisters of the USA! YEAH! ‘MURICA. And look, whilst The Clean and Cosmic Psychos didn’t release anything new this year, there have been some great releases. From Flying Lotus, to Caribou, to Sharon Van Etten, a wealth of talent was dumped on our ears in 2014. Here’s the best:

Honourable Mentions: Ty Segall (‘Manipulator’), Flying Lotus (‘You’re Dead!’), Schoolboy Q (‘Oxymoron’), Sharon Van Etten (‘Are We There’), The War on Drugs (‘Lost in the Dream’), Mogwai (‘Rave Tapes’), Ex Hex (‘Rips’), Golden Pelicans (‘S/T 12″).

10. Caribou – Our Love

A big toss-up between this record and Ty Segall’s ‘Manipulator’. Both are extensive leaps forward from established artists with near perfect track records. But it was Ty Segall’s inability to self-edit his 17-long tracklist that pushed Caribou into adoration. ‘Our Love’ is swirling, mystifying romance that is impossible to not get caught up in. Plus, “Can’t Do Without You” is a smoothie of Taylor Swift’s pop supreme, Spiritualized’s piercing gaze, and the best production this side of ‘Endtroducing…’.

Caribou is coming to Aus in February for Laneway, and a show at the Sydney Opera House, February 3.

9. The Men – Tomorrow’s Hits

2014 has been the year of The War on Drugs, and whilst ‘Lost in the Dream’ is a superb album, it seems unfairly raised above another working class band. But then again, that’s the curse of The Men. For too long, they have been serving up stone cold cult classics, from ‘Leave Home’, to ‘Open Your Heart’. On ‘Tomorrow’s Hits’, they almost completely erase their sludgy-punk/noisy past, and embrace country and the kind of rock ‘n’ roll that was deemed raunchy, but acceptable in the 1950’s. You can sing the praises of how great the lyrics and progression of “Red Eyes” and “Under the Pressure” are, but in turn, you’d have to say that about “Settle Me Down”, and “Different Days”. As far as Bruce Springsteen-love goes, The War on Drugs take the pain, but The Men preserve the joy. (Album Review)

8. Todd Terje – It’s Album Time

Speaking of joy, nothing came even close to the maniacal fun of Todd Terje’s debut album, a perfectly honed magnum opus. ‘It’s Album Fun’ seems like something Dan Aykroyd  and Bill Murray would’ve cooked up in the 80’s, but only if Barry Gibb had possessed their souls.  Deep, sultry cuts of synth-led party jams, Todd Terje never misses a beat. What’s more, he occasionally ramps things up into a sentimental overload, with the Bryan Ferry-assisted tear jerker “Johnny and Mary”. But never fear, Terje’s classic ability to spice things into a frothing paste of swooning, electronic, Cantina-band-esque lushness  is always around the corner, as “Inspector Norse”, “Delorean Dynamite” and “Strandbar” easily attest to.

7. Liars – Mess

Once again, very hard to pick between Liars’ new record and Mogwai’s brilliant ‘Rave Tapes’. Both records had a hard-edged zealot-ness to them, but Liars simply harnessed and appropriated it more. Liars showed they weren’t afraid to plunge into the obtuse, as their insanity and demented nature ramped to new heights. Their music has always bordered on paranoid, but now it became frighteningly so, a schizoid mixture of frightening, alien sounds munching on gnashing lyrics. For sheer animated terror and cartoonish slasher value, Liars’ ‘Mess’ was a helluva album. (Album Review)

6. Die! Die! Die! – SWIM

Hailing from New Zealand, it feels like this shouldn’t be an Internationally Acclaimed Album (TM), but rather one of our own. Alas, New Zealand have different accents and laws, and as such, we can’t claim an act like Die! Die! Die! as one of our own in the same way we can with Russell Crowe.

On their fifth record, Die! Die! Die! maintained the ferocity and biting cynicism that would seem appropriate for a band with their name. The friction caused between the power trio that is Andrew Wilson, Michael Logie and Michael Prain is enough to power a town to the same capacity of a nuclear reactor. As soon as someone can figure out how to harness this, the global energy crisis will be over. Until then, let’s just enjoy the beautifully pure punk explosion that is ‘SWIM’. (Album Review)

5. Shellac – Dude Incredible

The almighty Shellac returned this year, and delivered a brutal heap of music that hate-shamed most of the rock music released this year. Powered as always by Bob Weston’s inhumanly powerful bass, Steve Albini’s serrated lyrics and Todd Trainer’s consistently vile drumming, ‘Dude Incredible’ is a bile-spewing, looming work of the Gods of the music industry. You want affirmation in a world full of 5SOS and neutered indie acts that think a fuzz pedal is a nickname for an electric razor? Chuck on ‘Dude Incredible’, and allow yourself to whisper those same words over and over again, as each crushing song belies your idea of awesome. (Album Review)

4. Eagulls – Eagulls

Depressingly good, Eagulls have painted a picture of a visceral England so much more brilliantly than any Arctic Monkeys record ever could. Their debut self-titled is raw power, in the Stooges sense of the word. It pulsates and breathes, each song a punch in the guts whilst a bellowing drill sergeant insists you surge onwards. It is a sensational experience to put on this Eagulls record, a face-melting treatment of pop smudged and bludgeoned by teeth-baring, white-knuckled frenzy. (Album Review)

Eagulls are coming to Aus in February for Laneway Festival, and play a show at OAF on Friday 30th January.

3. King Tuff – Black Moon Spell

Probably the most perfect party rock record since Judas Priest’s ‘British Steel’ (“BREAKING THE LAW, BREAKING THE LAW, DUH DUH”). Coincidentally, “Headbanger” begins with a line that swoons over a girl’s record collection: “You had Sabbath, and Priest and Number of the Beast, it was heavy metal perfection”. Indeed ‘Black Moon Spell’ excels at just being a really fun record to rock out to. From the Marc Bolan-isms to the Slash-levels of gratuitous guitar solos, King Tuff revels in an  unparalleled love of classic rock with a modern flair, laying down the tastiest jams since Ozzy was in Sabbath. (Album Review)

2. Spoon – They Want My Soul

There’s a reason Spoon are the most consistently rated band of all time – they’re really fucking good at being an indie rock band. Believe it or not, being an indie band is hard. People, like me, will hate you for no other reason other than you have a trendy haircut, which means YOU’RE MUSIC SUCKS SHIT! But with Spoon, there’s nothing to hate; Britt Daniel simply aches with great songwriting. Catchy melodies snared by heartbroken lyrics on “Rent I Pay”, “Do You” and “New York Kiss” are too much. (Album Review)

1. Cloud Nothings – Here And Nowhere Else

Ahhh, Cloud Nothings. Over the course of four albums, they’ve gone from a solo project of fun, if not particularly memorable, lo-fi pop jams, to throttling, fearsome snaps of exhilaration. When the Steve Albini-produced ‘Attack on Memory’ came out a few years ago, everyone was thinking that there was no way it could be topped. Enter ‘Here and Nowhere Else’, a challenger with balls and a willingness to show them (that sounds fucked up).

The lyrics of ‘Here And Nowhere Else’ are deceptively simple, but nonetheless powerful. They’re bolstered even more so by some of the most brilliantly scathing music of the last few years. But most memorable is the way Dylan Baldi, a bearded and bespectacled fellow of an unassuming nature, belts and inflects his words with whipping fury. There is something in his throat which carries through onto record that is completely unexplainable. Pair that with vicious ability and concentrated aggression that wouldn’t be out-of-place on a  Fugazi record, and you’ve got Cloud Nothings at their jaw-dropping finest. (Album Review)


Top 10 International Albums of 2014 (So Far…)

Welcome to the latest episode of ‘My Opinion Is More Valid Than Yours’. For those that don’t know, this is an ongoing series of how my opinion matters more than yours. Pleb. Anyway, in this episode, we will be examining the best albums of yonder that have emerged in the first part of 2014.

10. The Lawrence Arms-Metropole

For a long time, The Lawrence Arms always existed outside of my consciousness. I never paid heaps of attention to them, and the songs I had heard only mildly piqued my interest. But a copy of their new record ‘Metropole’ changed that, and it actually made me believe that pop-punk hadn’t been completely soiled by shitty bands that confused slitting wrists with amazing melodies. On ‘Metropole’, The Lawrence Arms pump out track after track of infectious blue-collar punk tunes, intensely wrapped in headbanger blues. ‘You Are Here’, ‘The YMCA Down the Street From the Clinic’ and ‘Paradise Shitty’ are probably some of the best pop-punk tunes to have existed since the last apocalypse false warning.

9. The Men-Tomorrow’s Hits

It always seemed like The Men were one step ahead of the game. They were releasing visceral, ravaging post-punk and noise music before No Age were even foetus’  (sic). But they always managed to evolve and re-evaluate their position on the musical compass. So for their fifth outing, they went alt-country. Now usually, I’m of the ‘Fuck Alt-Country’ persuasion, but The Men managed to turn the genre into a romper of a good time. Songs like ‘Different Days’ and ‘Pearly Gates’ unfolded with majesty, more blue-collar punk, but this time pushed through a birth canal of harmonica and twinkling guitar.

8. Damaged Bug-Hubba Bubba

John Dwyer is more famous for his Thee Oh Sees project, who released a pretty fantastic album this year as well. But it was Damaged Bug, his new solo electronic-tinged outing that got my underwear soaked. It’s a morbid fantasy, morose guitars drowning under thick, black synth work. It’s like Dwyer’s voice is being held under a lake of caviar, like in that scene from James Bond. And just like James Bond, Damaged Bug emerges on top of his game with a world class entertainment product, full of explosions, exotic locales and evil incarnate defeated…for now!

7. The Black Lips-Underneath the Rainbow

Finally, The Black Lips, one of my all time favourite groups, released a new record. It’s a lot more cleaned up to say the least, but it’s got just the same amount of unruly ruckus that has stained the legacy of true rock n roll. The Black Lips throw down some Southern Comfort, slaughter a few teenagers and strap down their guitars for a full-blown massacre of garage rock on this album. They blow through 12 songs with the dashing handsomeness of Prince Charming on backyard meth. And the result is an insanely enjoyable record.

6. Future Islands-Singles

It seems like with ‘Singles’, Future Islands are finally going to break the mainstream. I mean, they always hung out on the precipice of global adoration, but this new album is so completely orgasmic, it’s hard to imagine them getting ignored again. Obviously there’s the new ‘Let’s Stay Together’ in ‘Seasons (Waiting On You)’, a song so readymade to be the new token making love track it’s a surprise it’s not on the soundtrack of every sappy romantic comedy being released this year. But the rest of the album continues on the breathless synth route that worms its way into the heart of everyone with even a semblance of romanticism.

5. Mogwai-Rave Tapes

Mogwai have released another epic album, complete with huge, lengthy songs that manage to be more dangerous than having sex with a pufferfish. The notes are razor sharp, trawling through the mire of Death Star-esxplosion level synth work, and Hiroshima-level devastation. Mogwai have never sounded as huge or as carnivorous as they do on this record.

4. Liars-Mess

Likewise to Mogwai, Liars did a 180 on their previous post-rock/noise sound, and evolved to some kind of tortured disco. Songs like ‘Mess On A Mission’ and ‘Pro Anti-Anti’ sound like the Grim Reaper had too much sugar, and found himself a set of decks. ‘Mess’ makes you want to dance yourself into the apocalypse, both terrifying and completely alluring.

3. Sharon Van Etten-Are We There

Unfortunately never got around to reviewing this one, but it is simply too stunning of a record to ignore. In this album, Sharon Van Etten hits her ultimate stride of marrying beautiful, love-torn lyrics with hypnotising music. She’s done it splendidly before, but whereas before it was all about recognising and sympathising with the listener, this time around she actually causes the heart to crack and break under the brunt of her brutal honesty and sadness. When ‘Break Me’ and ‘Our Love’ ring in, you’ll be swimming in a pool of your tears, whilst the anaconda of ‘Are We There’ slowly strangles you, whilst Jon Voight looks on in sick fascination. Sick 1997 film reference, bro!

2. Eagulls-Eagulls

Whilst the overwhelming majority of buzz bands manage to fail, or at least disappoint, on their debut albums, Eagulls simply raised expectations to ear-shattering levels. They shook off their Killing Joke-rip off comparisons, and made the original look like a copy. That’s some Inception-like shit right there. But ‘Eagulls’ greatest strength is putting together enormous, tidal riffs and clashing them with pop hooks that would make Michael Jackson weep. The result is a explosive and spine-snapping record that has contributed to way too many mosh-pit related hospital visits.

1. Cloud Nothings-Here And Nowhere Else

Easily the best record of 2014 so far, Cloud Nothings shun their indie rock/lo-fi past, and scrape the barrel of intensity for a truly visceral and honestly breathtaking record. It’s eight tracks of pounding fury, each song building a giant demolition machine that’s knocks down jaws and floors expectations. ‘Here And Nowhere Else’ is an album that examines loss, fragility, the unknown, disappointment, and separation, and lays these themes down next to some of the most white-knuckle riffery and jarring music heard. Every song on this album is worthy of your attention, a real no-filler, all killer record. Sorry Sum 41, Cloud Nothings actually came through on that promise.

Album Review: Cloud Nothings-Here And Nowhere Else

There are two types of Cloud Nothings song: good and amazing. His first album ‘Turning On’, when Cloud Nothings was nothing more than Dylan Baldi and a couple instruments, was good tracks, with the amazing ‘Hey Cool Kid’. Second album, a self-titled effort, is again full of good songs, with a few more amazing ones like ‘Forget You All the Time’ and ‘All the Time’ sprinkled throughout. Yes, it is weird that the best two songs are both called pretty much the same thing. Then, third album ‘Attack On Memory’ fully launches into what had been hinted at in previous efforts, a bubbling rage and layered texture to Cloud Nothings that we all knew was there, but had never been fully exposed. Like some sort of rash, Steve Albini uncovered the rage that Baldi obviously had, and fixated it into a brooding, tumultuous near-perfect album.

Now, a couple years on from that near-perfect record comes the logical next step-‘Here And Nowhere Else’. This is an album that’s so perfect, it should be viewed the same way the Internet views cat videos and Jennifer Lawrence. It’s got the perfect mix of brutality, speed, pain, hope, distortion, fuzz, and the million other things that make an album irresistible. It’s jam-packed with songs that are snarling and anthemic, switching between tracks that you blast at your slammed bedroom door, and songs that you shout along to haphazardly with your friends in your backyard over a couple beers.

For the first time, it seems like Dylan Baldi is really stretching his vocal chords. Completely gone are the days where there’d be a quiet sing-a-long point in a Cloud Nothings album. These songs are entrenched in fury and spit-shined with a grime that comes from years of adoring Sonic Youth. They’re dirtily poetic. Take for example, ‘Psychic Trauma’. It rushes at a full-lenght pace, so fast you’d think your colon is about to fall out of your butthole just out of the fury. Your have a right to be afraid-once it reaches its pinnacle of avalanching drums and lurching squeals of guitar, you will shit your pants. Not a metaphor, not a hyperbole-there will be a brown turd burglar in your jeans by the end of ‘Psychic Trauma’.

Such is the way of this album. Infectious grooves give way to fearsome screams, as Baldi ignites himself over and over again, the musical equivalent of Thích Quảng Đức. There’s the growling guitar paralleling the earnest questioning of ‘Giving Into Seeing’, the cliff-face, nail-bitingingly loud ‘Now Hear In’, and the 7 minute epic ‘Pattern Walks’, which moves in a million directions, whilst always retaining a fury and passion that would put the Texas Chainsaw Massacre family firmly in the place of top-notch fans.

But it’s the closer of ‘I’m Not Part of Me’ that ties the album together. There’s all this newfound anger and propulsion for Cloud Nothings, a momentum that’s seemingly unstoppable, and trapped in high velocity. But what’s Baldi trying to say? Is he just a bummed out guy that can make killer songs? No, ‘I’m Not Part of Me’ answers that by saying that it doesn’t pay to be angry all the time. Sometimes, you’ve got to let go, take a step back, and see everything for what it really is.

You can have all the killer riffs you want, but it’s the ultimate message that’s delivered in ‘Here And Nowhere Else’ that makes the album a modern day masterpiece. There is absolutely nothing to fault with this album. From start to finish it transfers energy and electricity that’s been unheard for so long. This album takes the Cloud Nothings name to soaring heights, with an execution that would do any pop culture icon justice. Although it’s only March, ‘Here And Nowhere Else’ is easily the most impressive record to date, and will be near-impossible to top.

March Playlist

Holy shit, this playlist is crazy, a gritty, modern reboot of a mixtape if ever there was one. There’s a whole lot of underground punk, with Gutter Gods and TAX repizentin’ for the genre. And there’s some great new ones from Cloud Nothings, Juan Wauters and Cerebral Ballzy. And then there’s the usual proliferation of older but amazeballs stuff, like the spleen-rupturing Trash Talk and GG Allin, smooth pop of The Holidays, and  the cool college rock of PILE. Enjoy!

1. Touch Sensitive-Slowments

2. Cloud Nothings-Pyschic Trauma

3. TAX-Bent Spear

4. Oozing Wound-Call Your Guy

5. Plastic Plates-Things I Didn’t Know I Loved (Bufi Remix)

6. Trash Talk-F.E.B.N

7. GG Allin-Bite It You Scum

8. PILE-Number One Hit Single

9. Juan Wauters-Sanity Or Not

10. Miles Brown-Electrics

11. Cerebral Ballzy-Speed Wobbles

12. The Holidays-Voices Drifting

13. Liars-Mess On A Mission

14. Adolf Sasquatch-Oxygen Thief

15. Gutter Gods-Virtual Reality

16. Ernest Ellis-Black Wire

17. DZ Deathrays-Gina Works At Hearts

18. Movement-Like Lust

19. Pink Mountaintops-Ambulance City

20. Eagulls-Possessed

Album Review: The Dirty Nil-SMITE EP

It’s not secret that I’m a pretty big fan of Canadian band The Dirty Nil. If you don’t believe me, well then just look here or here or here. That’s called evidence. Motherfucking CSI shit. Straight out of a crime lab, and served up to you on an Internet screen with an abundance of F-bombs. You’re welcome.

Anyway, after three years of churning out some glorious singles that were made to put Sum 41 to shame as the go-to teen angst rock band for 15 year olds (me), The Dirty Nil have released their debut EP. And believe me, they’ve gone from mere prodigies of alternative rock and pop-punk to actual disciples of dead set punk. There’s still some of the glorious anthem qualities that ‘Fucking Up Young’ and ‘Verona Lung’ initially showcased. But instead of leaning on the big hook/chorus combo, The Dirty Nil have gotten dirtier, filthier and more ragged. They’ve stripped back the fleshy pop tendencies. Or rather, they’ve skinned them alive, and feasted on the gory remains. Then they’ve gotten up on a stage and bombastically torn down all cynical expectations.

So, where there first stood a band that could’ve easily gone the way of New Found Glory or The Ataris, there’s now a band that screams authentic punk right in your fucking face. It’s so close, your ears actually get monsooned from all the flecks of spit flying from the stage. Take ‘New Flesh’, the paranoid track that squirms and retches with all the potency of some of OFF!’s best tracks. It’s bile-ridden, scourge-infested zombie carcass grabs you by the neck and throttles you until a coma seems like a nice way out. And ‘Pale Blue’, which starts off with a wildfire dash towards creating as much musical havoc as possible, builds and builds itself until there is literally no escape from the crumbling tower of the world’s tallest song metaphor.

However, The Dirty Nil haven’t completely abandoned their roots of delivering solid tunes with just enough pop sheen to cause an entire audience to collectively abandon moshing for a heart-warmin sing along. This pop genius comes in the form of ‘Wrestle Yü To Hüsker Dü’ a track that would make Bob Mould so proud of punk music that he could wish his hair back into existence. This is a song so emotionally wrought and perfectly crafted towards making a stadium’s worth of teenagers sway with lighters in the air, and yet it doesn’t feel like a tired, by-the-numbers piece of shit. Woah….that’s crazy unique, man.

So, for a band with not all that much material, The Dirty Nil can only impress. Within five songs they can tear off your genitals, patch them back together, and then tear them right off again. They’re genuine, they’re passionate, and they’ve got all the elements for what should be a super successful rock group that doesn’t make you want to slit your throat. Really, there’s only a couple popular modern bands out there like that (*cough, Japandroids, Violent Soho, Cloud Nothings, cough*) and The Dirty Nil have more than enough panache to join that group. If you’re the sort of person that likes music with balls and grit, get this fucking EP.

New: Cloud Nothings-I’m Not Part of Me

Holy fuck balls stick on a dingo baby’s asshole! New Cloud Nothings right!? Didn’t expect for this to rock up and make me prematurely lose my shit in the middle of class.

However, it did, and I have no regrets, because it’s a super awesome mad track. That’s the highest level of madness a song can receive, by the way. It achieves that rank because ‘I’m Not Part of Me’ combines both the romantic dreaminess of Cloud Nothing’s self-titled record with the Steve Albini-influenced post-punk of their 2012 record ‘Attack on Memory’.

You may be wondering how good a thing that could possibly be. Let me tell you that this is fucking awesome news, because a combination like that allows for the song to be both catchier than a ball thrown by a sloth, and hard-rocking enough to be able to get people ultra-moshing!

Album Review: Males-Run Run Run/MalesMalesMales

As most know, I have an unhealthy fixation with underground New Zealand guitar-pop. Now, whilst that may seem specific, the niche gives it a lot more appeal. Knowing that this awesome, warm and fuzzy sound won’t be tapped into by many people gives it an ownership that accentuates its already astounding goodness. However, I’m going to go ahead and violate my personal musical porn collection and share a band that all should know about, for the sake of purity and goodness of the human spirit.

The band in question is known as Males, a staple of the Fishrider Records stable. They’ve released a mini-album/double EP thing that is worthy of your attention simply because it is attention grabbing. Listening to the second track ‘Lucky Too’, if you aren’t charmed out of your pants by the simple ecstasy and excitement that the band portray, then you may as well go swallow that bowl of cyanide that you’ve got laying next to your table Scrooge McDouche.

Indeed, every song on the record is bursting with excitement, like those small dogs you see at parks that will take any opportunity to hump your leg. However, unlike those tiny dogs, you’ll let yourself be desecrated by Males, because their pop is too good to ignore. It sees a concoction of the Flying Nun stuff as well as some more modern underground indie rock and pop. However, Males stay confined to New Zealand Kiwi stamp thing, and any influences you’ll hear on this record are solely Western Nations of the South East Asia Subcontinent (or WNSEAS) variety. Think along the lines of a bunch of Kiwis that dig on Cloud Nothings.

With songs like ‘Weakness’, ‘So High’ and ‘Over and Out’ ensuring that the listener is completely infatuated, Males solidify themselves as a band that tread a line between nonchalant infectiousness and genuine rock n roll genius. And guess what? You can buy the album from Males’ Bandcamp right here for $7 New Zealand, which is like Australian dollars but not. However, something that can be agreed on is that you need Males’ album in your life like Winnie the Pooh needs the check into rehab for his honey addiction.

Clancy: Keepin’ it Real Playlist

It’s my mate’s birthday today, and he has, hands down, one of the most eclectic and beautiful music tastes in the world. Often, I will sit next to him in one of our bullshit classes together, cross my legs in wonder, and stare at him as he triumphantly teaches me the ways of the latest in good music, like Sophacles would teach his pupils Philosophy in Ancient Greece. He is a lover of all things, from Kurt Vile to Lapalux and everything in between. I could not, in good faith, forget his birthday and not make him this. Happy Birthday to the doppelganger of Slender Man. Sorry for the lack of r@p mu-sick.

1. Kurt Vile-Wakin’ on a Pretty Day

2. The Soft Pack-C’mon

3. Heathers-Teenage Clothes

4. Ooga Boogas-Circle of Trust

5. Shlohmo-Just Us

6. Holy Other-Yr Love

7. Fuck Buttons-Colours Move

8. Death Grips-Culture Shock

9. Marijuana Deathsquads-Same Pizza

10. Nite Jewel-Suburbia

11. Megastick Fanfare-June Strangelets (Seekae Remix)

12. Nicolas Jaar- Why Didn’t You Save Me

13. Nosaj Thing-Snap

14. Cloud Control- There’s Nothing in the Water We Can’t Fight (bretonLABS remix)

15. The Soft Moon- We Are We

16. Sex Beet-I’m In Love With You (So Shut the Fuck Up)

17. Wavves- Post Acid

18. Cloud Nothings-Hey Cool Kid

19. Maus Haus-No More Girls

20. The Fresh & Onlys-Waterfall